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  #1  
Old 08-04-2007, 11:23 PM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Question Serato or FS? Or CDJs?

Ok, so I have been resisting this whole digital thing as long as I can, but it appears the battle will eventually be lost. I am still accumulating vinyl, but I know one day all the record stores will be closed. Sob. Sob.

So where to go with digital? What is the evolution of digital audio going to be? Are CDJs an intermediate solution that will be supplanted with harddrives?

Where does technology like Serato or Final Scratch fit in? Which is better?

Can anyone with a good crystal ball sort me out?

thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2007, 01:05 AM
johnpuga1982 johnpuga1982 is offline
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I would go with CDJ's. The computer is a machine and with all machines they fail. Plus Serato and Final Scratch just sound bad.
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  #3  
Old 08-05-2007, 01:21 AM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpuga1982
I would go with CDJ's. The computer is a machine and with all machines they fail. Plus Serato and Final Scratch just sound bad.

What is it that makes Serato and FS sound "bad"? I assume if they support FLAC or WAV files that I have recorded from vinyl (using a good ADC) and send the signal out a good DAC that it should be ok?

Any particular CDJ you like?
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  #4  
Old 08-05-2007, 03:14 AM
jmark jmark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnpuga1982
I would go with CDJ's. The computer is a machine and with all machines they fail. Plus Serato and Final Scratch just sound bad.

With regard to your first point: CD players are machines too, and they fail. That said, if you're going to do computer-based DJ-ing on a professional level, you owe it to yourself to have some redundancy. Since hard drives are by far the most failure-prone component, having bootable backups (as well as a backup of the music library) is a very good idea.

Regarding sound quality: the source material is usually the limitation as to the sound quality provided by Serato. I use Serato with both the SL-1 interface, and with the TTM57SL mixer...I personally think that mixer is one of the best-sounding units out there, and I say that as someone who has always been highly skeptical of digital mixers.

My big attraction to computer-based DJ-ing is the simple ability to find stuff immediately. I DJ-ed with records and (later) CD's for a long time, and especially when I started using a lot of CD-R's, the organization and ability to find music became a real headache.

If you do mostly pre-planned sets that might not be such a big deal, but using Serato has allowed me to be much more spontaneous and spend much less time hunting for stuff.

I've been using Serato on a 12-inch G4 Powerbook since late 2005, 3 to 5 times per week, and the *only* time it has ever messed up was once when I accidentally snagged the USB cable. Other than that, it has *never* done anything to screw up playback...none of the glitches and dropouts that were common with both versions of Final Scratch. I had Final Scratch 2 before getting Serato, and went through three different computers (and literally hundreds of hours' worth of troubleshooting)....it never worked reliably.

I don't consider Native Instruments (now selling "Traktor Scratch") a trustworthy company to buy stuff from...they like to advertise features that don't always work correctly, the registration/authorization process is rather draconian, and they charge regularly for routine updates. They also have terrible tech support, and tend to participate in their on-line forums only when they want people to buy some new update. Native Instruments' "questionable-at-best" reputation carries well beyond their DJ products...the Digidesign Pro Tools forums often have posts from very frustrated users of NI's other products.

The support from Serato and Rane, on the other hand, is superb. Reading both the Serato and Native Instruments forums in some depth should make the differences pretty clear!
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  #5  
Old 08-05-2007, 04:39 AM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmark
....

I've been using Serato on a 12-inch G4 Powerbook

Do you use mp3's or wav's or flac? I just checked the spec's on the Rane site and they did not mention FLAC. That's my preferred format since I like uncompressed audio and can't attach tags to WAV files.

thanks kindly, Sasha
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  #6  
Old 08-05-2007, 05:26 AM
jmark jmark is offline
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Sasha/Acidburn,

I use MP3's, encoded at 320k CBR at "highest quality" (slower encoding) with LAME. I know it is popular to bash on MP3 (especially here), but I have pretty damned good hearing, and almost always find the difference between MP3's encoded that way and the source WAV or AIFF to be un-noticeable or (at worst) insignificant.

The 320k MP3 files created with some other encoders, on the other hand, sometimes sound terrible. All MP3's (even at the same bitrate) are *not* created equal.

When possible on the digital download sites, I always buy WAV files (and I use sites not offering WAV files only as a last resort)... for three reasons.

1) If I want to do editing or remastering, I don't want to have to subject the audio to a decode/re-encoding (*very* bad for audio quality);

2) The MP3's from the download stores (even at 320) are often of inferior quality to what I encode myself (see above).

3) When the time comes that I find it practical/possible to either use FLAC or some other lossless format supporting tagging, I want uncompressed files to encode from.

Serato doesn't support FLAC currently. It's a feature some have asked for, and it would definitely be a good thing to visit http://www.scratchlive.net/forum/ and under "Feature Suggestions" mention that you, as a potential buyer of Serato Scratch Live, find FLAC an important feature. My expectation is that, as storage becomes ever larger and less expensive, that support for FLAC will be considered as more important.
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  #7  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:26 AM
vinyl_junkie vinyl_junkie is offline
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Let me ask you these questions...

Do you really want to go around with a laptop, sound card, hard drive and lots of fiddly wires when you are booked to play at a club?

Can you always get to the back of the mixer? What if it's like a Urei and is permanently mounted in a console? Got a screwdriver?? What if they are running the turntables at Line Level before the signal hits the mixer?

What if your PC crashes while you are checking your email?

What if the club doesnít have decks? And only CDJ's

What if the stuff gets damaged/things spilt on it?

Save yourself the hassle and get CDJís
Itís the industry standard, every club has one, itís like what the Technics SL-1210 was/still is in a way. I donít see this serato/hard drive technology taking off until there is a standard and that product will be installed in all the clubs, unless you are Derrick Carter or John Digweed and have a DJ rider I donít think itís worth the hassle.
For home use thatís a different thing.
Also personally I canít dig a virtual crate, get lost with all the crap on the screen.
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  #8  
Old 08-05-2007, 09:52 AM
T. Tauri T. Tauri is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmark
Serato doesn't support FLAC currently. It's a feature some have asked for, and it would definitely be a good thing to visit http://www.scratchlive.net/forum/ and under "Feature Suggestions" mention that you, as a potential buyer of Serato Scratch Live, find FLAC an important feature. My expectation is that, as storage becomes ever larger and less expensive, that support for FLAC will be considered as more important.

FLAC's metadata still leaves something to be desired--at least going by the evidence of what tags are available in Traktor compared to mp3.

Still waiting for a format that can really handle all the kinds of metadata digital music is now capable of generating (track info, cue points, waveform overview, etc etc...).

BTW, can FLAC carry higher resolution audio (24/32bit, >44khz)?

Peece,
T. Tauri
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  #9  
Old 08-05-2007, 11:35 AM
grizz grizz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinyl_junkie
Let me ask you these questions...

Do you really want to go around with a laptop, sound card, hard drive and lots of fiddly wires when you are booked to play at a club?

Can you always get to the back of the mixer? What if it's like a Urei and is permanently mounted in a console? Got a screwdriver?? What if they are running the turntables at Line Level before the signal hits the mixer?

What if your PC crashes while you are checking your email?

What if the club doesn’t have decks? And only CDJ's

What if the stuff gets damaged/things spilt on it?

Save yourself the hassle and get CDJ’s
It’s the industry standard, every club has one, it’s like what the Technics SL-1210 was/still is in a way. I don’t see this serato/hard drive technology taking off until there is a standard and that product will be installed in all the clubs, unless you are Derrick Carter or John Digweed and have a DJ rider I don’t think it’s worth the hassle.
For home use that’s a different thing.
Also personally I can’t dig a virtual crate, get lost with all the crap on the screen.

in my area you often do not find cd-players in the clubs. they often have none, or maybe one, and then it's the cheapest and smallest model from pioneer, already beaten and spilled with lots of beer. if you would get in the underground locations here, you would be lost with cds.

and promoters/managers will only give out money to rent some players if you have a name and rider. and then they're still complaining about the money they have to spend.

and here's not a single club that has the mixer mounted into a console.
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  #10  
Old 08-05-2007, 01:01 PM
cocoy cocoy is offline
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As a professional DJ of nearly 24 years, I've come to realize that your personal choice of hardware isnt always whats available. In today's day and age a DJ has to have flexibility.

I remember when I first encountered Traktor some years ago. I was playing an Easter weekend in Boracay (Philippines). The guy playing at the neighboring club was my recording engineer at that time. He was more known for what he could do with a computer rather than with turntables. At that time I was still playing exclusively vinyl (Ouch!!! my aching back). He showed me Traktor version 1. It looked like a video game to me. He was controlling it with his Ozone keyboard.

We got into a discussion that we're at a stage in our "careers" that we should be able to use whatever is made available. That really broadened my horizons.

My typical DJ week goes like this:

Thursday nite is just my Mac running Traktor 3 and my Native Instruments Audio 8 soundcard. No external midi controller, just assigned the essential keys to my Mac's keyboard.

Friday nite I play at the most happening bar with the worst sound system. You guessed it right! No turntables, just whacked Pioneer CDJ-100's. So I just bring around 50 cds and I'm good to go.

What a relief for Saturday nite. I get to play mostly "proper" clubs with Technics SL 1200 turntables, Pioneer CDJ-1000 MK3, and either a Allen & Heath Xone 62/92 or a Pioneer DJM600/800 mixer.

Being professional means that your prepared for whatever eventuality. My UDG trolley bag usually contains 35-40 records, my Mac, NI Audio 8 soundcard, 2 Shure White Label cartridges, 2 slipmats, 100+ cds, Ultrasone DJ-1 headphones, my spare Pioneer SE-5000 lollipop, spare connectors, power adapters and emergency medication for hangovers, indigestion & allergies. You can never be to sure.

At the end of any evening, the crowd wont remember what equipment the club had. Or how great the DJ was with his turntable, cdj or laptap. They will remember if your track selection and mixing made an impact on them. Thats what happens when your place of work is usually a smokey dark room.
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  #11  
Old 08-05-2007, 01:08 PM
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michele michele is offline
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i think honestly that the best contemporary dj set up is "vinyl" (when i say vinyl it means two calibrated and well isolated decks with good cartridges), matched with serato or traktor vinyl control systems with their audio outputs routed to the mixer.
this is a good way to have the best from both worlds.
you can also play high resolution uncompressed files that are simply uncomparable with the obsolete cd standard.
i never appreciate the sound/feeling of the cd players.
this is my opinion.

for johnpuga1982:
also a cdj player, turntable or reel to reel, are machines.
todays operating systems (like osx) are rock solid, and i think you have more "soul" on those modern dj software applications than on a "plastic" pioneer cdj that try to emulate something from the past...
and sorry... but the sound from traktor or serato is very good.

Last edited by michele : 08-05-2007 at 01:42 PM.
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  #12  
Old 08-05-2007, 04:34 PM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Tauri
FLAC's metadata still leaves something to be desired--at least going by the evidence of what tags are available in Traktor compared to mp3.

Still waiting for a format that can really handle all the kinds of metadata digital music is now capable of generating (track info, cue points, waveform overview, etc etc...).

BTW, can FLAC carry higher resolution audio (24/32bit, >44khz)?

Peece,
T. Tauri

re: FLAC higher resolution audio, yes, it is possible to create a FLAC file with the highest resolution and bit depths. More info here if you are interested: http://flac.sourceforge.net/
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  #13  
Old 08-05-2007, 04:37 PM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cocoy
As a professional DJ of nearly 24 years, I've come to realize that your personal choice of hardware isnt always whats available. In today's day and age a DJ has to have flexibility.

Yes, that makes sense - fortunately, I am bedroom jockey at this point in my life and no longer spin out. So, then, what is your preference for spinning at home? And which system do you like more?

The rough consensus seems to be that Serato is more widely used and more importantly (for me at least) is stable and has the best "vinyl-like" experience.
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  #14  
Old 08-05-2007, 04:41 PM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinyl_junkie
Let me ask you these questions...
Save yourself the hassle and get CDJís
Itís the industry standard, every club has one, itís like what the Technics SL-1210 was/still is in a way. I donít see this serato/hard drive technology taking off .....

That's the thing...I hear conflicting opinions about this. I have a friend who spins somewhere around the world almost every other week and he tells me his is usually the only guy still lugging around vinyl (mostly old soul, italo, old house). He says that most of the guys he see's playing are using Serato, then followed by CDJs.
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  #15  
Old 08-05-2007, 04:46 PM
acidburn acidburn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmark
Sasha/Acidburn,

I use MP3's, encoded at 320k CBR at "highest quality" (slower encoding) with LAME. I know it is popular to bash on MP3 (especially here), but I have pretty damned good hearing, and almost always find the difference between MP3's encoded that way and the source WAV or AIFF to be un-noticeable or (at worst) insignificant

When possible on the digital download sites, I always buy WAV files (and I use sites not offering WAV files only as a last resort)... for three reasons..

Mark, thanks for the info, I do appreciate it. Since I am ripping and encoding my own vinyl (I want to avoid downloading as much as possible until someone puts a gun to my head), I want to encode to a format that will give me the flexibility of transcoding to something else with losing fidelity. I know that high rate MP3's do a decent job of reproducing the music - I am with you on the LAME encoder, I used to use it myself, but I just want to rip my collection once and not again....so it's FLAC for me. I would have selected WAV's, but the only drawback there was lack of metadata.

I am curious however about your decision to go with CBR vs VBR. Back when I was ripping to mp3's, I felt I always got a better sounding file using variable bit rate.

thanks kindly, Sasha
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  #16  
Old 08-05-2007, 06:15 PM
cocoy cocoy is offline
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I forgot to mention that Traktor Scratch is my preferred medium. Choosing between TS and Serato, I chose TS because of the "flexibility" of its Audio 8 soundcard. You could use it as a stand alone soundcard for either Traktor or Ableton or even Pro Tools. Or you could hook it up to turntables or cd players as a controller.

Just one important note to those new to TS and Native Instruments. You cant use it at all with the minimum computer requirements as stated in its instruction manual. You have to double the RAM and processor speed just to get the thing going. If you have a basic laptop forget TS as an option.
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  #17  
Old 08-05-2007, 07:27 PM
johnpuga1982 johnpuga1982 is offline
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I like a third TT or CDJ. You can't do that with Serato or F.S.
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  #18  
Old 08-05-2007, 07:58 PM
francois francois is offline
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I have been using Traktor DJ Studio (not Scratch) for about 5 years, and playing daily for thousands of people using it pretty much exclusively, with no crashes whatsoever. Yes, my hard drive caught fire once, and my motherboard blew up, or has some power failures, but otherwise all good. I must have special luck?... I wonder why it is that laptop systems have such bad reputations? Or is it just that people who don't know better figure that the computers should administer themselves, rather than their users taking the time to keep them in tip-top shape, optimized, disks defragmented and everything else? Not sure.

As for Native Instruments having a bad reputation, I am part of the Traktor DJ Studio beta-tester group, and I must say that their commitment to releasing quality products on a stable codebase is -from my point of view- very impressive. Although it is quite clear that some people are not having a good time with their products, maybe the difference is that they are expecting it to work with 'whatever' audio interface and cheap-ass PC. Just as Digidesign is giving out a very strict 'compatibility list' of approved hardware that is what they have determined will work reliably with their products, I did take the time to study beforehand and bought what I knew would work for well for such a system as Traktor; ymmv™. I am sure that if things were as bad as they say, I would have switched to another system or risk losing gigs a long time ago, seems to be the opposite actually, they keep coming fast and furious. Creatively, it has taken me that long to adapt to the hardware and software, when now playing CD's (or vinyl) I feel really limited and not able to work the gear creatively the way I want to, limited to a linear timeline.

Anyway, I must say that my answer being outside of your choice of options, I feel like the lone dissenting voice. I do not miss shiny circular audio discs, or their emulated time-coded discs or CD players as the sole, unique way of playing music. Any USB MIDI controller can do the same without having the mechanics of these spinning things add complexity and possible snafus to it, IMHO.

Just for kicks, let's re-hash the same things which have been repeated before:

• All digital audio sounds bad. It does make it a lot easier for sound installers to administer their systems (think 'audio processor' and such) so even if you are playing vinyl, chances are that you are not really playing on an analog system, but already through a digital processor. It bears repeating: most people today have not heard the sound of real analog, and wouldn't know it if it hit them over the head. When it does, they usually have a 'moment', which quickly goes away as no one else cares, as common wisdom goes, clubs are places where people go to dance, get high and find sex, not to be audiophiles.

• That being the case, some digital audio sounds worse, and some even worser than worse. The best bet is to find a file format that gives you the resolution which can help your sound files have a better description of what the original waveform was supposed to be like when it was analog.

•Most people (as in the Hydrogen Audio double-blind test crowd) swear that perceptually, MP3 files sound really close to CD, and that you can't hear the difference. Fair enough, I agree with that when those tests are done at home or with headphones. But working DJ's don't play at home. Translate this into a 45,000 Watts rig for a large listening space, and I promise to you that you'll certainly hear a huge difference between the two. By the way, in case you haven't noticed, CD's sound like sh*t on a big system. No bass, edgy, shrieky highs... some point of reference you got there.

• As an example, jmark quotes his files being 320 k encoding using MP3 codec. Mine are 4611 k at 24bit / 96 kHz linear PCM from analog source. The usual argument then is that hard drive space is at such a premium. O RLY ? Yes, 15 years ago, it was probably so. But I just bought a 1 Terabyte disk for $440.00 That drive holds 5,000 songs at that high quality setting. Gee, something I must be missing. Or is it the download speed when purchasing online? Dunno... yes, 15 years ago (again) it would have been a factor with a 56 kB/s modem. With today's broadband speeds, not sure what the issue is. Beatport has their entire catalog in uncompressed .wav format.

• Everyone has different priorities. I spend time encoding most of my library from vinyl using the highest quality A/D I can afford. I figured that way the files I create will still be playable 20 years from now, with better D/A technology. Are you interested in planning for your future, or just for today?

• I find it amazing that 30 years after that standard was created, (Red Book CD digital audio: 16 bit / 44.1 kHz sampling rate) everyone has fallen victim to the marketing hype and considers (and the original question) CD quality the reference, the base point. Serato doesn't even go higher in either sampling rate or bit rate. Go back to basics, take a record, and the CD version of it, and play those two synchronized in a big club, going from A to B back and forth. Please don't send me your doctor bills when you possibly discover the difference. At least playing high bit-rates helps alleviate the problem a bit.

Breaking news: Digital audio still really sucks, but now that we've trained a whole generation of new listeners to believe the marketing hype, they wouldn't know the difference, or if they did, happen to care about it. Interesting that digital cameras keep pushing resolution forward (my phone has a 5-Megapixel camera included) and digital audio stays the same for 1/4 of a century. Either we have really bad hearing, or have fallen victims to a colossal hype everyone is too ashamed to admit they fell for.....

•• Commentary on the breaking news: Why am I taking such care in playing ultra-high quality audio files when (as stated above) nobody cares anyway? Well, for one, I think that when I play it does make a bit of a difference and adds extra 'oomph' to the bottom end and clarity to the top. It does feel better (to my admitedly ageing my ears).

Disturbing update: (NSFW) There are some formats (such as the 1-bit DSD format) which are supposed to sound much better than all that, but as was proven in the last format war VHS -vs- Betamax, the better product doesn't win, only the one with better marketing. Only a few years after having been introduced, the Super-Audio CD is quietly falling into obsolescence, just as no supersonic jet has replaced the Concorde since it was retired as the only supersonic commercial jetliner.

There is no moral to the story. Everything sucks.... some things a little more, some a little less. As for your choice of system, try them all out, and see what you like. Use your ears, don't believe the hype and follow the audio sheep, and you'll do fine. It'll still all suck, no matter what... just don't kid yourself about it. Hopefully in another quarter-century, people will look at this age as a time of terrible confusion and decaying standards.

It's a sad time for real audio enthusiasts.

30 years on and I'm looking back at systems built 25 years ago as the 'golden age'....

...there was, however, a small escape hatch located to the left of the warp entrance point, which most players failed to notice when they arrived at that level, as it was cleverly disguised as a vintage 1950's Heathkit Tube Amp advertising display. it led to..... (to be continued)

FK
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  #19  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:13 PM
vinyl_junkie vinyl_junkie is offline
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Hey Francois have you seen these yet? > http://www.korg.co.uk/products/digit.../dr_mr1000.asp

They allow you to record at SA-CD bit and sample rates, I would of thought these would help the popularity of SACD and the PS3 (what with beeing able to play SACD) Otherwise yeah the fromat is almost dead.

I wonder how those Korg convertors sound though? I dont hold great things for it's sound, marketing hype may be?
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  #20  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:34 PM
francois francois is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinyl_junkie
Hey Francois have you seen these yet? > http://www.korg.co.uk/products/digit.../dr_mr1000.asp

They allow you to record at SA-CD bit and sample rates, I would of thought these would help the popularity of SACD and the PS3 (what with beeing able to play SACD) Otherwise yeah the fromat is almost dead.

I wonder how those Korg convertors sound though? I dont hold great things for it's sound, marketing hype may be?
Yes, of course I have. Many people are saying great things about them, including Craig Anderton, who usually is pretty spot on with these things.

I almost bought one last week, and decided to wait a bit more. the issue with those is that they are strictly for archival use, as the format cannot be edited natively, it needs to be converted back to PCM. That, by the way is something I have been meaning to ask but never got around to.

What makes it that 1-bit DSD audio cannot be edited? How does Sony manage to do it for their own SACD releases? Or are those transfered to PCM audio and back to DSD?

Maybe this is time for this part of the discussion to become another thread?

FK
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  #21  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:35 PM
vinyl_junkie vinyl_junkie is offline
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Hang on...Would a Pioneer CDJ-1000 with a USB input for a Hard Drive that can play 24bit 96Khz Wav files solve all this?
Industry standard deck right, so you just turn up with 2 hard drives (One on each deck) but get this they still keep the optical drive.
I think this will be their next step, how they do it is another thing and personaly I don't think they will support 24bit 96K files due to the sheer size of the things, the hardware will need to be reall beefy to do all that.
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  #22  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:44 PM
francois francois is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinyl_junkie
Hang on...Would a Pioneer CDJ-1000 with a USB input for a Hard Drive that can play 24bit 96Khz Wav files solve all this?
Industry standard deck right, so you just turn up with 2 hard drives (One on each deck) but get this they still keep the optical drive.
I think this will be their next step, how they do it is another thing and personaly I don't think they will support 24bit 96K files due to the sheer size of the things, the hardware will need to be reall beefy to do all that.

They already support such a format when encoded into a DVD-Audio disc (DVD-A, very esoteric format, wouldn't even know what software to use to encode those, but I imagine Sonic Solutions will do it, as well as Minnetonka or whatever it's called) played through their DJV flagship audio/video players, as well as played as 24-bit/96 k audio encoded DVD discs as the audio soundtrack for a video disc (video can be blank, just containing audio program). I have never tried this myself, but they (Pioneer) assured me that this was the case.

FK
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  #23  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:46 PM
vinyl_junkie vinyl_junkie is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by francois
Yes, of course I have. Many people are saying great things about them, including Craig Anderton, who usually is pretty spot on with these things.

I almost bought one last week, and decided to wait a bit more. the issue with those is that they are strictly for archival use, as the format cannot be edited natively, it needs to be converted back to PCM. That, by the way is something I have been meaning to ask but never got around to.

What makes it that 1-bit DSD audio cannot be edited? How does Sony manage to do it for their own SACD releases? Or are those transfered to PCM audio and back to DSD?

Maybe this is time for this part of the discussion to become another thread?

FK

That's a good point, I almost forgot of the importance of a good dither algorithm.
IMO I donít see the point of being able to edit in the 1bit format as of yet due to there not being any pro (DJ) SACD players out there so it would have to be converted to PCM to be able to play in either your CD player or as a higher resolution PCM wav file on Traktor.
If you want to make an SACD then no doubt itís a bit dumb but itís a good start.
Sony like to keep things in house donít they? Lol
Also I donít think SACD has taken off due to the cost of switching from CD to the format would be very big, imagine of the cost of all these studios having to re-record all those master tapes, then there is the risk of what if itís a flop? And can we really be arsed if people still think CD is the best? I think sony shoot them selves in the foot a lot of the times. The format could have been great.
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  #24  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:50 PM
jmark jmark is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinyl_junkie
Hang on...Would a Pioneer CDJ-1000 with a USB input for a Hard Drive that can play 24bit 96Khz Wav files solve all this?

If 24-bit 96k is really important to you, you can play those on one of the DJ-type DVD players Pioneer makes.

Although I have to add, in the absence of source material that was recorded at 24-bit 96k, I fail to see the point.
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  #25  
Old 08-05-2007, 08:59 PM
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mynameismatt mynameismatt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by francois
clubs are places where people go to dance, get high and find sex, not to be audiophiles.

I want a shirt or sticker that says that.
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