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Old 12-28-2013, 07:57 AM
vinyl_junkie vinyl_junkie is offline
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Join Date: May 2005
Location: South East Kent, UK
Posts: 1,828
I've owned the following Ortofon's

VMS-30, 510 mk1, 2M Blue, OM Pro, Pro S, DJ s, DJ e, Arkiv, Night Club S, Night Club E mk1 and used a whole load of others that weren't mine at other peoples houses.
I can't speak on the Super OM's or other OM hi-fi tips as I've only ever used a super om 10 at a friends place who has a Rega P25 but it sounded so wrong I'm going to say he didn't have it set up right or there was something wrong with the phono stage loading.

The only ones I found half decent were the VMS and 510 from the hi-fi range, mainly the VMS as it didn't have "that" Ortofon sound where it sounds like the loudness button is pressed.

When I brought the 2M Blue (This is part of Ortofon's brand new flagship Moving Magnet range that replaces the OM series) I was still using Night Club E's.
The 2M Blue was the biggest disappointment in the history of errrr yea what ever, any way the difference between that and the NCE was minimal.
Yes the 2M Blue had a slightly less sibilant top and a slightly more refined mid... When I say slightly, I really do mean slightly, the output was still crazy loud, cantilever was still big and suspension seemed still very stiff.
Not to mention that sound was still present.. Big wide mids and a boosted top end.

If you check out early reviews in decent mags that tend to be less biased they will confirm the poor tracking of the hi-fi tips and a frequency response that rises with frequency (confirmed by graphs and other tests) They still gave it top marks though and basically said phoa kids will love this haha Even though stuff like the AT 440MLa and other Nagaoka's all sound and perform better than the Ort.

This like a lot of cheap speakers it's done imo to impress in the showroom and make other products sound "bad" and "dull", the slight boost in highs makes it sound "detailed" and people love that especially when a lot of them are coming from CD (This isn't a dig at CD's but the way stuff is mastered to CD rather, check Reticuli's post some where back a bit)
With a lot of this modern music it can sound impressive albeit fatiguing after a while... Thing is play something with real instruments and you soon think wtf is this shieat trumpets don't sound like this

Where does dance music come into this? Ahh yes well a lot of modern cuts sound pretty nasty, they are cut incredibly loud and with a lot of HF.

In a interview with Ron Murphy he expressed his dissatisfaction with the Neumann lathe (probs the most common one out there) saying it's not that nice for cutting 12" singles, emphasising the fact that it distorts the high frequencies and it needs to be modified to cut a good loud dance cut.
He said a lot of people called him and asked him how to do it..Any way Ron used a Scully lathe (Not sure of the model)

I think a lot of deaf producers also ask for it too, a friend of mine who runs a small record label said to me his mastering and cutting engineer was the first one who told him "You are the first person not to ask me to boost the highs or to make the cut super loud"
There are a lot of clowns who have money and can buy a lathe now too..
So preferably you need a cart that can be able to track these far from perfect cuts and also not sound like ass.

Vinyl is pretty much dead now days compared to what it was in it's heyday which is why there is such little choice at this end of the market, all the big boys pulled out as it's too expensive. Dwindling market/return.
Where it's still big is the niche high end stuff, unfortunately I do not want to dedicate my life spending millions on Koetsu cartridges and turntables made out of solid gold hahah
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Last edited by vinyl_junkie : 12-28-2013 at 08:30 AM.
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